Snow-bored? Change the course

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Snow-bored? Change the course

JSC Ski and Ride club members Lucas Peduzzi and Jake Eustis look on as Brandon Covert airs over the flat tube with a huge smile on his face.

JSC Ski and Ride club members Lucas Peduzzi and Jake Eustis look on as Brandon Covert airs over the flat tube with a huge smile on his face.

JSC Ski and Ride club members Lucas Peduzzi and Jake Eustis look on as Brandon Covert airs over the flat tube with a huge smile on his face.

JSC Ski and Ride club members Lucas Peduzzi and Jake Eustis look on as Brandon Covert airs over the flat tube with a huge smile on his face.

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Many believe that the best way to get something done is to do it yourself. A recent Johnson State College snowboard club get-together put this belief into action after amassing hours of combined work effort to create a massive course stretching over 100 yards down a hill in the backwoods of Johnson.

Started over two months ago, the banked slalom styled course was first created as an easy way for Luke Peduzzi, acting JSC Ski and Ride president , and friends to get a few runs in during the school week without a drive to the mountain.

After the course started to become more impressive in size and more popular among the club members, the idea for a race was brought up. To keep the event less competitive this idea was eventually turned down and replaced by a plan to hold a future club meeting at the backyard park to attract as many riders as possible.

After two organized workdays with multiple participants, the track was groomed ready to ride.

“I’m really happy that the weather worked out and we could get as much done as we did before it got so warm,” said Peduzzi when asked about the outcome of the event.

On an extremely warm and sunny March 27, over 20 JSC shredders worked their way up and down the course for a perfect afternoon session.

The course began on a particularly steep down slope leading towards a 15-foot jump that continued into a series of shoulder-high berms and waist-high rollers.

The course incorporated a number of rails and quarter pipes sporting cedar log coping. These logs were salvaged from trees knocked over in the last ice storm.

Snow couches and seats were carved into the sides of the course for resting and spectating. Walls of snow upwards of four feet in height were created as a sort of guardrail that stretched the length of the course as a product of clearing snow from the path. Speed was essential because after the first down slope the course leveled out; however, this necessity was easily dealt with if the rider understood how to pump for speed.

“The rollers were sick and it was the only way to carry speed through the lower section. I only took a run or two but it was a beastly course, I mainly watched which was awesome too because a lot of people showed up,” explained Alex Sears, first year snowboarder and Ski and Ride club member.

“The course was well put together and much bigger than I expected. It’s a good thing to sesh when you don’t have time to go to the mountain,” said Russell Freeman, another JSC Ski and Ride member.

The following day Johnson experienced 50-degree weather and rain that was detrimental to the condition of the course. When it counted, however, the weather cooperated and the turnout was ideal. As the season winds down, this backyard event was an excellent way to celebrate all of the snowfall Johnson experienced this winter.

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